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Coursework

Summer 2020

TETD 816 – Teachers as Intellectuals
Dr. Eric Weiner

Official Course Description:

What are the major roles, responsibilities and competencies of intellectuals who work
within the broadly defined field of education? In 1967, Noam Chomsky famously argued
that intellectuals have 1) a responsibility to tell the truth and expose lies and 2)
understand and explain how ideology functions in the course of current historical events
to manufacture commonsense, i.e., as a lever of hegemony. Antonio Gramsci observed
that all radical social change requires a certain kind of intellectual leadership. Henry
Giroux argues that for schools to work in the service of justice and democracy, teachers
must become intellectuals. In addition to this work, we will read and discuss the work of
James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Edward Said, Malcom X, bell hooks, William F. Buckley,
Gore Vidal, Paulo Freire, Howard Zinn, Vaclav Havel, Toni Morrison, Chris Rock,
Malcom Gladwell, Stuart Hall, Dave Chappell, Michel Foucault, Susan Sontag, and
Guillermo Gómez-Peña. Each of these people have something important to say about
the roles, responsibilities, and competencies of intellectuals. It will be one of our major
tasks to make connections between their ideas and our work in and out of formal school
settings.

Class Project: A Letter To My Tenure Track Faculty (Available Upon Request)

This was an open, unpublished letter to my tenure track faculty, as if I was presenting to them at a new faculty meeting. Drawing on the work of intellectuals like Henry Giroux, Paulo Friere, and Stanley Aronowitz, I discussed that the process of getting tenure as currently constituted is part of the commodification of higher education in service to the economy and part of the enculturation into the university, examining the facets of academic freedom affected like shared governance, curriculum, and andragogy/pedagogy, as well as its effects on instruction. It highlights the importance of tenure in challenging commodification of students and curricula and its potential as a tool for allowing for education and research that makes our students, the system, and the world better and more equitable.


Fall 2020

TETD 801 – Policy Perspectives on Teaching and Teacher Education
Dr. Emily Klein

Official Course Description:

This course brings together theories and practices regarding teacher education and teacher development. It provides teacher educators with the habits of mind, skills, tools, and resources to analyze and evaluate: social, political, and economic arguments for increasing the quality of the teaching force; the competing agendas for the reform of teacher education (including professionalization, deregulation, and social justice); and the competing conceptions of teacher quality that accompany different theoretical perspectives. Teacher educators study a variety of teacher education and development issues, including teacher supply and demand, recruitment, initial preparation, certification, induction, continuing professional development, and program accreditation. They consider the impact of existing policies on teacher quality and teacher distribution and critique policies derived from current local, state, and federal legislation. They also explore their roles as advocates for teachers, students and families. Using artifacts, reflections, and related literature, students investigate themselves as teachers and teacher educators and write an autoethnography. 

Class Project: Auto/ethnography (Available Upon Request)


TETD 809 – Language and Literacy in Sociocultural Context
Dr. Michele Knobel

Official Course Description:

This course closely examines language and literacy as sociocultural practices. It draws on theoretical perspectives that consider language and literacy as embedded in sociocultural contexts and sociopolitical structures and processes. The course is designed to help students become familiar with various sociocultural theories that currently frame language and literacy studies and to develop an informed, theorized position from which to understand and examine language-in-use and literacy practices. Students engage with an historical overview of sociocultural literacy research in order to understand how such research informs effective classroom practice. This includes an examination of sociocultural research orientations, designs and methods. Students engage with ideas and issues pertaining to the ideological nature of language and literacy; the ways in which teachers’ and students’ preferred ways of speaking and being literate can clash within the classroom; sociolinguistic variation and social identities; the dominance of reading over other literacy modes within U.S. education; the ways in which classroom discourses shape student and teacher identities and literacy learning; in-school and out-of-school literacy practices; and digital literacies and their impact on education. This course prepares students to work with in-service and pre-service teachers within a wider policy and cultural context of literacy education that unfortunately tends to value narrow and decontextualized conceptions of language and literacy.

Class Project: One Faculty Member’s Account of Teaching Remotely During the Pandemic at a University in the US Northeast (Currently In Review)


Spring 2021

TETD 812 – History of Teacher Education
Dr. Jaime Grinberg

Official Course Description:

This course examines the history of teacher education and its relationship to schools and society from the 19th century to the present in the United States. It concludes study of institutions, organizations, and politics as contexts that shape teachers, teaching and teacher education. Students explore historical and contemporary analyses of curriculum and pedagogy in normal schools, teachers’ colleges, school districts, state colleges, elite universities, and alternate routes to teaching. They engage in an analysis of the enduring dilemmas of teacher education practices and policies and the impact of race, ethnicity, language, social class, gender, and (dis)ability on the structures, processes, and outcomes of teacher education.

Class Project: Discovering the History of the Feliciano School of Business through Curricular Changes (Available Upon Request)


EDFD 821 – Qualitative Methods for Educational Research
Dr. Michele Knobel

Official Course Description:

What are the major roles, responsibilities and competencies of intellectuals who work
within the broadly defined field of education? In 1967, Noam Chomsky famously argued
This course introduces students to the theories and practices of qualitative research. Students develop skills to critically analyze qualitative studies and the various components of research design. They are also introduced to a rich array of qualitative approaches and possibilities in educational research. They develop an understanding of what is involved in designing original research and have hands-on practice with qualitative data gathering.

Class Project: Continuing Edits on One Faculty Member’s Account of Teaching Remotely During the Pandemic at a University in the US Northeast (Currently In Review)


TETD 802 – Teaching and Teacher Education in a Diverse Society
Dr. Jeremy Price

Official Course Description:

In this course, future teacher educators examine the intellectual, moral, and practical dimensions of teaching and of learning to teach in contexts characterized by diversity related to such socio-cultural dimensions as race, ethnicity, language, gender, (dis)ability, and social class. They explore theories and research related to preparing prospective teachers and supporting the continuing education of practicing teachers to successfully educate students of diverse backgrounds. They learn about the elements of culturally responsive teaching and approaches to preparing culturally responsive teachers. They examine issues such as teacher orientations to teaching students of diverse backgrounds, teacher knowledge and beliefs, teacher socialization and development, contextual influences on teaching and teacher education, and programmatic elements of teacher education. They explore different ways to apply what they learn in the contexts of teacher education and teacher professional development.

Class Project: People, Pedagogy, Program, and Policy (Available Upon Request)


Summer 2021

TETD 817 – Research in Teacher Education: Reimagining Teacher Profession Learning for Social Justice & Equity
Dr. Emily Klein

Official Course Description:

This course offers a critical examination of the empirical research in an area of study in teacher education. Participants explore how teacher education research has been conceptualized and studied in the United States as well as the genres of research and debates that have emerged in this field of teacher education. Within this context, the course will offer students an opportunity to closely examine the role of theory in teacher education research. It offers an in-depth and state-of-the-art analysis of a contemporary issue in the evolving sociocultural context that impacts and dynamically shapes the policies and practices of teacher education writ large. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits, as long as the topic is different.

Class Project: Queer Theory & You: What is It & How Can I Use It? Canvas Course for University Instructors & Reflection (Available Upon Request)


Fall 2021

TETD 804 – Educational Equity and School Change
Dr. Jaime Grinberg

Official Course Description:

This course provides teacher educators an opportunity to examine how they can support practicing teachers in engaging in personal, classroom, and school transformation. Future teacher educators examine the dynamics of inequality at the individual, institutional, and socio-cultural levels and the ways in which teachers, individually and collectively, combat these inequalities through school change and social transformation. The course provides a theoretical framework for understanding the moral and ethical dimensions of school change and social inequality based on such factors as race, ethnicity, social class, (dis)ability, and gender. Future teacher educators are asked to apply this framework in investigations of various educational settings. Participants discuss such core concepts as social power, privilege, dominance and subordination, prejudice, discrimination, liberation, democracy, change-in-action, agency, and teacher leadership.

Final Project: TBD


TETD 807 – Studying Teacher Quality
Dr. María Cioè-Peña

Official Course Description:

There is general agreement that the quality of the classroom teacher is the single most important school-based determinant of student achievement. However, definitions and methods for assessing teacher quality vary greatly. This course examines different conceptions of teacher quality and critically inspects the values, assumptions, theories, and research upon which they build. Future teacher educators explore and use a variety of tools and approaches for assessing teacher quality.

Final Project: TBD